Leadership & Success!

Happy Anniversary: It’s now been a year of the corona virus pandemic and the lock down, it seems strange and odd that a year is passed so quickly, taken so long to fix and changed life so much.

For me the changes have been both subtle and dramatic, the most dramatic is having my partner work at home for a year! The subtle has been the has been the loss of contact with my family, yes video conferencing is ok, but it cannot replace real facetime and hugs, I miss them!

Success Is Addictive!

In the first three months of the pandemic most of my clients were able to continue their coaching and consulting, this was great it didn’t seem that the world was changing very much. But as some of firms downsized and then clients lost their positions and I lost them as clients. Many of my seminars are given in a live format, Covid cancelled most of that!

This gave me time to think about what I wanted to do next. What was there going to do? How was it going to do it? Did I actually still want to work? At 75 I wondered why was I doing this why was I coaching communication skills? Why was I coaching leaders?

After some thought LOL I decided but I actually like working and I’m not very good at being just doing nothing. I like being a coach, being useful. Most coaching is about helping an individual achieve goals or specific results, but what I have noticed that the pressures of being a CEO or leader are intense and stressful! Coaching people to success has felt counter to the real success in living a rich full life.

Leadership & Success

Unfortunately, success is addictive. The goal can’t be satisfied once; most people never feel “successful enough.” The high only lasts a day or two, and then it’s on to the next goal. Psychologists call this the “hedonic treadmill “ a better name is the rat race. Satisfaction seems to wear off almost immediately and then it’s run to next reward to avoid the feeling of falling behind.

It’s easy to say, ‘get off the treadmill’, but quitting isn’t easy for the success addicts. It is recognized that people hooked on substances, withdrawal can be an agonizing experience, both physically and psychologically. Anxiety and depression are very common after one quits any addiction. What is not recognized is success addiction, with all of the same costs!

Research finds that depression and anxiety are common among elite athletes after their careers end; Olympic athletes, in particular, suffer from “post-Olympic blues.” So many professional athletes end up in trouble or broke chasing the addiction to ‘success’ this is also true for start-up leaders, CEO’s and salespeople – they become addicted to the ‘win’, the next gig, the next sales goal, the share price or finding the next best thing to start!

A Different Coaching Model

I have coached success addicted, business leaders, professional speakers and athletes and helped transition to a life based upon a different values, helping them understand what drives them and what their real passion is and how to incorporate into daily life.

This challenge has inspired me to start a new kind of coaching model I call it ZEN: The Art of leadership – a coaching model to assist leaders enjoy life without paying heavy costs of success addiction, how to relax and enjoy the experience and ironically as a side effect  have more success. If you feel like you’re the on stuck ‘treadmill’ or feel dissatisfied with the success game lets connect. Here’s wishing you full success, Geoffrey

geoffrey@geoffreyxlane.com

Author | Certified Coach | Corporate Trainer | Speaker

Geoffrey has coached CEO’s, leaders, architects, engineers, public speakers and entrepreneurs: Here is a small collection of success stories from the different areas of Geoffrey’s background as a coach. Geoffrey has over 25 years coaching experience. He has led teams for 2010 Winter Olympic Bid, CN Financial Division, Shaw, Rocky Mountaineer, Sandwell Engineering, FKP Architects, Telus and Stantec. Geoffrey taught at the Sauder School of Business, Executive Education, at the University of British Columbia.

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